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ConnectMe! Outreach Resources

  • Sample Professional Outreach Email

    Note: This is a sample template. Be sure to adapt to your specific career pursuits, purpose for outreach, and the professional contact’s career & industry situation.

    Subject: Linfield ____(ex: Management Junior)__ Connection

    Dear (Ms. or Mr. Last name),

    My name is (your first and last name) and I got your contact information from Linfield Career Development. I am in the process of exploring several career options, with (the relevant career interest) being one.

    I am contacting you because I am interested in what you do as a(n) ___(job title at company) and would like to have a conversation with you to learn more about this industry and your thoughts about this career path.

    I am a(n)__(quick 1-2 sentence description of your major/career interests). With your background in ____(career field)_____ (and your roots at Linfield), I feel you would be a wonderful person for me to meet and I would learn a lot from you.

    For potential meeting times, I am available (give 3-4 general timeframes, such as Fridays after 1pm, and Tuesdays and Thursdays between 3pm-5pm. Stay away from non-working hours – if they suggest a Saturday or a 5pm time, that is up to them). I would be delighted to meet you in your office or a nearby coffee shop. Do any of those times work for you?

    Thank you for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience.

     

    Sincerely,

    Your first and last name

    Your Major, & Graduation Year

    Linfield University

    Your email

  • Sample Class Assignment Outreach Email

    Note: This is a sample template. Be sure to adapt to your specific career pursuits, purpose for outreach, and the professional contact’s career & industry situation. 

    Subject: Linfield ____(ex: Management Junior)__ Connection

    Dear (Ms. or Mr. Last name),

    My name is (your first and last name) and I got your contact information from (a department or person who gave you their information). I am currently taking the (title of course, such as Introduction to Mass Communication, or Contemporary Business) class. Part of our course includes a career focus, and through this, I am reaching out to professionals to explore several career options. One of my interests is (the relevant career interest).

    I am interested in what you do as a(n) ___(job title at company) and would like to have a conversation with you to learn more about this industry and your thoughts about this career path.

    I am a(n)__(quick 1-2 sentence description of your major/career interests). With your background in ____(career field)_____ (and your roots at Linfield), I feel you would be a wonderful person for me to meet and I would learn a lot from you.

    For potential meeting times, I am available (give 3-4 general timeframes, such as Fridays after 1pm, and Tuesdays and Thursdays between 3pm-5pm. Stay away from non-working hours – if they suggest a Saturday or a 5pm time, that is up to them). I would be delighted to meet you in your office or a nearby coffee shop. Do any of those times work for you?

    Thank you for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience.

     

    Sincerely,

    Your first and last name

    Your Major, & Graduation Year

    Linfield University

    Your email 

  • Informational Interviewing

    Why an informational interview?

    Above all informational interviewing is the ultimate networking technique, the purpose is not to get a job but to explore career path options and get a feel for the skills a job really requires and how you might best fit into that work setting. You gain confidence in talking with people about the job because you are learning need to know concepts beyond just the basics.

    Approaching the Interview:

    STOP! Before any outreach- do a self-check on social media (i.e. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram). Do you have the proper privacy settings? Are there any inappropriate pictures or posts you need to delete? Does your social media image reflect the way you want others to see you?

    Setup- When sending an email or message over LinkedIn it is important to be specific about what it is you are looking for: are you asking for an informational interview? Asking to tour the worksite? Looking to connect because of a specific job? Give a couple dates that work if you want to meet, and specify if you want to this interaction to be in person, over the phone, etc. This helps your contact understand your intentions and timelines.

    Example - “Hello, my name is Joe. I’m a senior at Linfield University and I’m doing some career exploration. I would like to come in to talk to you to learn more about what you do (Specify what parts of their job interest you). I’m going to be in Portland next Tuesday; do you have any time in the afternoon that we could meet? We only need about 20 minutes.”

    Research- Be informed about the company, so you are able to ask more relevant questions. You’ll respond thoughtfully to information and any questions the interviewee might ask you, and you won’t ask questions that could easily have been answered by doing your homework.

    Dress- Dress in a way that makes you feel confident and that will impress!

    Confirm the meeting- It is standard to email the professional a confirmation of your appointment 1 day prior to the meeting. This is a common courtesy and appreciated from professionals.

    Arrival- Be on time. The interview starts when you walk through the door. Treat the receptionist with respect and kindness. Your handshake makes an impression. Body language speaks louder than words!

    Asking Questions- Go with questions! Have 10-15 questions written that you can ask; don’t be surprised if you don’t get to them all; that’s ok! It is important to be prepared, Professionals appreciate when you can carry on a conversation. Remember you are the one asking the questions! Ask open-ended questions.

    Keep the Conversation Going- DON’T jump in and start talking for the interviewee. Let them explain their initial answer. Use words like and? , so? , go on, and then what happened? You never know, you may be able to discover hidden jobs or get referrals to companies that are hiring.

    Tips & Tricks

    Make the interview a casual process. Most people enjoy talking about their work so just being curious will open doors.

    Make it a conversation! Ask the questions you want but don’t be afraid to let the conversation deviate from your script. Let the person you’re interviewing talk because they might bring up something you never thought of. Note reactions on an objective level, but don’t ignore personal feeling; what you naturally respond to is important.

    Do more than just one or two informational interviews about a given area of work; gathering a broad information base is essential and will help you avoid snap judgment and impressions based on a single scenario.

    Final Actions

    NEVER ask for a job, interviewees will believe you misled them about your intentions for the interview.

    You reflect on Linfield: Everything you do as a Linfield student reflects upon not only yourself, but is also a reflection on your classmates, other alumni, and the Linfield community as a whole. It is important to act with gracious professionalism to continue to add to the amazing reputation that Linfield deserves.

    Send a thank you card or letter within 3 days. Let them know they were helpful and thank them for their time. Ask the person to keep you in mind if they come across any other information that may be helpful to you. Include your email address and phone number under your signature.

    Always remember to smile and relax! Be confident in your skills and abilities. Practice with someone beforehand. Come to the Career Hub and practice your mock informational interview!

     

  • Sample Informational Interview Questions

    • What is your job like?
    • What is a typical day or week like?
    • What do you do? What are the duties/functions/responsibilities of your job?
    • What kinds of problems do you deal with?
    • What kinds of decisions do you make?
    • What percentage of your time is spent doing what?
    • How does the time use vary? Are there busy and slow times or is the work activity fairly constant?
    • How did this type of work interest you and how did you get started?
    • How did you get your job what jobs and experiences have led you to your present position?
    • Can you suggest some ways a student could obtain this necessary experience?
    • What are the most important personal satisfactions and dissatisfactions connected with your occupation? What part of this job do you personally find most satisfying? Most challenging? What do you like and not like about working in this industry?
    • What things did you do before you entered this occupation? Which have been the most helpful? What other jobs can you get with the same background?
    • What are the various jobs in this field or organization?
    • Why did you decide to work for this company?
    • What do you like most about this company?
    • Why do the customers choose this company?
    • Are you optimistic about the company's future and your future with the company?
    • What does the company do to contribute to its employees professional development?
    • How does the company make use of technology for internal communication and outside marketing?
    • How does a person progress in your field? What is a typical career path in this field or organization?
    • What is the best way to enter this occupation?
    • What are the advancement opportunities?
    • What are the major qualifications for success in this occupation?
    • What were the keys to your career advancement? How did you get where you are and what are your long range goals?
    • What are the skills that are most important for a position in this field?
    • What particular skills or talents are most essential to be effective in your job? How did you learn these skills? Did you enter this position through a formal training program? How can I evaluate whether or not I have the necessary skills for a position such as yours?
    • How would you describe the working atmosphere and the people with whom you work?
    • Is there a basic philosophy of the company or organization and, if so, what is?
    • What can you tell me about the corporate culture?
    • What is the average length of time for an employee to stay in the job you hold? Are there incentives or disincentives for staying in the same job?
    • How has your job affected your lifestyle?
  • How to create a Linkedin Profile?

    How to get started

    1. Go to LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com and sign up in the “Join LinkedIn Today” box.
    2. Confirm your account through your email address.
    3. Edit your profile
    4. Edit your qualifications by adding your current, past employment, and degrees earned.
    5. Add: Summary (look up LinkedIn summary examples), Specialties/Skills, Connections, and Websites
    6. Get Recommendations
    7. Follow companies to learn about job openings and industry information.
    8. Join some groups that interest you!

    Useful Tips

    1. Complete Your Profile, the more complete it is, the more jobs LinkedIn will suggest for you.
    2. Engage with posts and articles to maintain a visible presence on LinkedIn.
    3. Your Headline Matters- it is the first thing someone will see about you!
    4. Update Regularly- that way you increase your commitment with the LinkedIn community.
    5. Show yourself- your face is important, it shows who you are and that you are real.